Wednesday, 7th December 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Afghan sewing factory offers lifeline to war widows

By Abiodun Ogundairo
20 March 2021   |   10:23 am
Dozens of women widowed by the Afghan war have been given a lifeline by the army, stitching military uniforms indistinguishable from the ones their husbands died in.

Related

12 Jun
For more than nine months, Afghan girls over the age of 11 have been prohibited from going to high school. The Taliban have not reneged on the ban they imposed on taking power last August, despite their initial promise to do so. In the western city of Herat, FRANCE 24's reporters followed one teacher who hopes that her former students will be able to continue their education. They also met a teacher who is defying the ban by giving clandestine lessons. Meanwhile, some fathers are trying to convince the authorities to reopen girls' schools for their daughters.
12 Jun
Russia's war in Ukraine is derailing the global economy's recovery from the pandemic. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is the latest to slash its forecast for economic growth, warning of high inflation and a possible food crisis. Also in the show: India's central bank raises interest rates for the second time in less than a month, while Turkey's government refuses to do so, despite spiralling inflation.
13 Jun
Almost 10 months ago, Afghanistan fell into the hands of the Taliban. The hardline Islamists' return to power led to a mass exodus of the Afghan population, with the US taking in some 78,000 refugees. California received the largest number, followed by Texas, where some 10,500 Afghans are already calling the Lone Star State home. Texans are proud to welcome them, as our correspondents report.
17 Jun
In an online video, a train is seen transporting tanks. Claims on social media have suggested that these images show Finland sending military equipment towards the Russian border. The video was seen by some as a sign of imminent conflict and an escalation of the war in Ukraine. FRANCE 24's Georgina Robertson and Sophie Samaille take a look at the video in more detail.
13 Jun
Even as the war goes on, Ukrainians are tracking down war criminals. Kyiv authorities say they know of 3,000 war crimes and have 300 possible culprits' names from their region alone. They say international cooperation will be required to bring these Russian soldiers to justice.
19 Jun
Would Beijing back away from its strategic partnership with Moscow if the war in Ukraine goes nuclear?
17 Jun
The court fined the foundation that owns Wikpedia for refusing to remove articles about Russia's invasion of Ukraine, war crimes in Bucha and related topics.
19 Jun
Ukrainian opera singer Sergiy Anastasyev, who had to flee the war in his home country, now lives in Bonn, Germany. He talked to DW about how singing has become therapy for him, and how he longs to return to Ukraine.
18 Jun
In Russia, critics of the war in Ukraine are increasingly being reported to the police. DW spoke with Russians who have been betrayed by their own relatives, friends, colleagues and neighbors.
19 Jun
The conflict has cut off supplies from Ukraine's ports, which once exported vast amounts of cooking oil as well as cereals such as maize and wheat. This has reduced the global supply and caused the price of alternatives to soar. Global food prices are almost 30% higher than the same time last year, according to the UN.
16 Jun
The Mexican state of Michoacan is facing an unprecedented wave of violence. More than 800 homicides have been recorded there since January, making it Mexico's most violent state. Criminal groups are waging war to control territory, while the state's residents have become hostages and victims of the violence. Our correspondents Quentin Duval, Laurence Cuvillier and Juan José Estrada Serafín report.
18 Jun
Although fierce fighting continues in eastern Ukraine, people in the Kyiv region are already starting to rebuild, two and a half months after the withdrawal of Russian troops. The Ukrainian government estimates the cost of damage at more than $100 billion nationwide. Kyiv is looking for massive investment and aid from international allies, but also wants Russia to foot the bill. FRANCE 24's Catherine Norris Trent, Pauline Godart and Wassim Daly report.