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Afghan journalists ‘have to get out of the country’

By DW
17 September 2021   |   10:56 am
A vibrant media landscape had developed in Afghanistan over the past 20 years. Since the Taliban takeover, media professionals face immediate danger and even death. Activists are urgently calling for help.

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