Wednesday, 18th May 2022
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Afghan Hazaras live in fear under Taliban rule

A black and white Taliban flag flies over the blown-up statue of a revered Hazara chief at the entrance to Bamiyan in central Afghanistan. Since the radical Islamists swept to power seven weeks ago, they have repeatedly promised a more moderate, inclusive brand of rule than during their last stint, when minorities were brutally persecuted. But members of the Hazara community here don't believe them.

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Afghan restaurant owner Aziz Ahmed, who has called the UAE home for over 20 years, says the Taliban's return to power is little short of a nightmare. The Taliban, who overran Afghanistan in 10 days, previously ran a brutal form of Islamist government when they ruled between 1996 and 2001, confining women to home, forbidding entertainment and publicly beating and executing prisoners.
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Although US military withdrawal raises the risk of terrorist activity, experts say the Taliban will likely value pursuing international recognition of their rule over harboring militants.
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Afghan women: An uncertain future under Taliban rule
4 Sep 2021
Afghan women will be allowed to study at university, but there would be a ban on mixed classes under their rule, the Taliban's acting higher education minister said on Sunday.
13 Sep 2021
Less than a month after they returned to power, the Taliban have begun going after LGBTQ people in Afghanistan. Members of this group reflect on their fears and the brief moments of freedom they used to have.
14 Sep 2021
Since the Taliban took over power, their decrees and crackdowns have shown how the Islamic fundamentalist regime wants to repress the rights of women and girls.
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Quiffs, mohawks, and crew cuts were hairstyles barbers were accustomed to styling for image-conscious young men in Afghanistan's third-biggest city of Herat. But all that has changed since the Taliban took over the country in mid-August.
27 Sep 2021
Even though the Taliban's reliance on foreign aid money could moderate their stance toward women, higher education for girls and women in the country still faces many challenges.
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Yahya (not real name) who identifies as gay and a non-conforming person, left the relative safety of their Kabul home just three times in six weeks after the Taliban took control of the Afghan capital. Yahya says. "If anyone identifies us, our lives will be under threat. We're just inside our rooms, praying nothing bad happens to us."
9 Oct 2021
A black and white Taliban flag flies over the blown-up statue of a revered Hazara chief at the entrance to Bamiyan in central Afghanistan. Since the radical Islamists swept to power seven weeks ago, they have repeatedly promised a more moderate, inclusive brand of rule than during their last stint, when minorities were brutally persecuted. But members of the Hazara community here don't believe them.
9 Oct 2021
Afghan journalists who spoke with DW say the already-difficult situation for the nation's reporters and other media personnel has become much more precarious under the Taliban.