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Group blames Borno govt over expelled Nigerian refugees

By OakTV
23 January 2019   |   5:23 am
A human rights group, Save Humanity Advocacy Centre (SHAC), has blamed the Borno State Government over the plight of about 100,000 refugees recently expelled from Cameroon.

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