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Underwater cables arouse interest of world powers

By France24
10 June 2021   |   4:20 pm
Some 99 percent of global telecommunications now transit below our oceans, via thousands of kilometres of underwater cables. Billions of pieces of information are exchanged, some of which are arousing the interest of world powers. Intelligence services around the world are increasingly using these cables to spy on other countries. Our France 2 colleagues report, with FRANCE 24's Emerald Maxwell and Jennie Shin.

 

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Some 99 percent of global telecommunications now transit below our oceans, via thousands of kilometres of underwater cables. Billions of pieces of information are exchanged, some of which are arousing the interest of world powers. Intelligence services around the world are increasingly using these cables to spy on other countries. Our France 2 colleagues report, with FRANCE 24's Emerald Maxwell and Jennie Shin.