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Uganda’s president seeks to boost trade and rein in borrowing

By Reuters
26 January 2022   |   2:14 pm
Uganda wants to curb its borrowing and boost exports in sectors such as meat and dairy as the East African country lifts restrictions triggered by the coronavirus pandemic, President Yoweri Museveni, and government officials. Uganda's trade push follows several years of reduced Chinese lending to the continent and as programmes designed to offer relief to indebted countries as they recover from COVID 19-induced slumps start to expire.

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