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The story of Brexit by four British literary giants

By France24
07 December 2019   |   2:06 pm
Once upon a time, four British rock stars of the book world - Ken Follett, Lee Child, Jojo Moyes and Kate Mosse - decided to go on an anti-Brexit European crusade to keep hold of their links with their European readers. Along the way they stopped off at FRANCE 24's studios in Paris to talk to Culture Editor Eve Jackson and Europe Editor Catherine Nicholson about their Brexit shame, their disappointment with UK politics and why they felt the need to tell their European fans that they still love them. For

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