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Refugees in Ivory Coast build back businesses hit by COVID-19

By Reuters
15 January 2022   |   2:09 pm
Refugees in Ivory Coast are starting to rebuild businesses affected by the economic slowdown caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, through initiatives sponsored by the United Nation refugee agency (UNHCR), to help integrate refugees in the West African country.

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