Friday, 27th May 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

How Jordan’s decision to integrate Syrian refugees is paying off

By France24
10 March 2021   |   7:00 am
It's been almost 10 years since the start of the Syrian conflict. A quarter of the population has been forced into exile – mostly to neighbouring countries like Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan. Few have returned to Syria. Jordan still hosts 1.5 million refugees, according to authorities. Until relatively recently, Syrian refugees were forbidden from working there legally. But under pressure from the international community, the kingdom changed its laws to allow Syrians to be employed in agriculture, construction, hospitality and industry. Our correspondents report.

Related

29 Aug 2021
Around two hundred Afghan refugees who fled their country before the Taliban took control gather at the Pakistan border with Afghanistan as they wait to follow the required procedures to be allowed to cross. “We emigrated from Afghanistan during bombing and hardships, when Muslims were in trouble,” says Molavi Shaib. “Now, praise be to Allah, the situation is normal, so we are returning.”
31 Aug 2021
Afghan refugees in Greece are increasingly worried about their status. The EU’s differing and uncertain asylum policies are making it even harder for them to cope.
1 Sep 2021
Albania agreed to host Afghan refugees while they are being vetted for visas for the US. Although some in the country feel that Albania has a duty to help its NATO ally, others feel Albania is struggling enough as it is.
4 Sep 2021
Speaking to DW, FDP lead candidate Christian Lindner recommended focusing on finding safe refuge for Afghans in "the immediate vicinity." He also criticized Merkel for failing to engage with a conflict she "inherited."
12 Sep 2021
A report by Amnesty International contradicts some governments' views that Syria is now safe to return for refugees. Returnees have faced detainment, torture, disappearance, and sexual violence.
11 Sep 2021
Turkey is home to millions of immigrants, but economic instability brought on by the coronavirus pandemic is fueling mistrust of migrants.
8 Sep 2021
At a compound set to host attendees of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, a few hundred Afghan refugees await their fate, hoping they will be accepted in Europe or America. Some like Ahmad Wali Sarhadi, who hasn’t spoken to his wife and five children since he left them behind in Kandahar, have no idea what lies ahead.
23 Sep 2021
When the Taliban seized Afghanistan, tens of thousands of people fled the country. Among them were former members of the Afghan security forces. Fearing Taliban reprisals, they've fled to neighbouring Iran, which hosts the second-largest population of Afghan refugees in the world. Temporary camps have been set up, but Iranian authorities are already considering sending the Afghans back. Our correspondent Reza Sayah reports from Tehran.
5 Oct 2021
More than 9,000 people are stranded at military bases in Ramstein and Kaiserslautern. Washington suspended flights when measles were detected among evacuees landing in the US.
17 Oct 2021
Thirty-one-year-old Lina Fayyad jabs and sprawls with a male Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter as she prepares for her upcoming match in the UAE Warriors Arabia Championship. As the only professional female MMA fighter in Jordan, Fayyad is a member of an all-men's team, 'Gladiators', with whom she trains and competes in regional and international championships as she has no local counterparts. The young fighter, dubbed as the "fierce savage" has been engaging in combat sports since 2012 thanks to the support of her father - a former boxer - who encouraged her to pursue it.
18 Oct 2021
"I didn't know what a marathon was until today", says one of a group of Syrian orphans taking part in a race in the rebel-held northwestern city of Idlib. The event has been organised by an NGO in a bid to introduce children who have lost their parents in Syria's ongoing conflict to different kinds of sports. Nearly 500,000 people have died in the conflict since it started in 2011 with the brutal repression of peaceful demonstrations.
22 Oct 2021
Huddled around cooking fires as winter looms in Bosnia, refugees are risking beatings and humiliation from Croatian police in the desperate hope of a new life in the European Union. Largely from Afghanistan, many of them have endured months or years of flight from war and poverty, only to be met by Croatian police clubs and pointed guns at the gates to EU territory. At a ramshackle camp near the northwest Bosnian border town of Velika Kladusa, a group of mostly Afghans is hoping to cross into the EU. Some have been on the road for years and others left as the Taliban overthrew the Western-backed government in August.