Wednesday, 10th August 2022
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Breaking the echo chamber: Divisions, culture wars and how to end them

By France24
27 December 2020   |   7:00 am
In France, 28 percent of people get their news from social networks and almost half of those under 35s say it’s their main source of information. An information revolution – but there’s a downside to it too. Internet giants like Google and Facebook use algorithms to tailor future results just for you, in line with your past clicks and "likes". That means we end up trapped in our own personal filter bubbles - with all future results weighted to be in line with what each of us already likes or agrees with.

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