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Australia’s property slump drives wealth drop

By Bloomberg
31 March 2019   |   3:43 pm
Australia’s slumping property and stock markets have driven the biggest decline in household wealth in seven years. Household wealth decreased 2.1 percent in the final three months of last year.

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