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Zimbabwe’s cash-strapped government selling elephants

By AlJazeera
03 March 2017   |   3:31 pm
Critics are condemning the Zimbabwe government’s sale of elephants to countries such as China. A live elephant can retail at about $60,000 depending on its size, age and health.

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