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Zimbabwe court says internet shutdown illegal as more civilians detained

By Reuters
23 January 2019   |   8:03 am
Zimbabwe's government exceeded its mandate in ordering an internet blackout during civilian protests last week, a court ruled on Monday (January 21), as authorities pressed on with rounding up opposition figures blamed for the unrest.

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