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Why cancer is often a death sentence in Africa

The number of cancer cases is notably on the rise in sub-Saharan Africa. But medical professionals say there is not enough awareness, facilities, or political will to change the situation.

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10 Jan
The 33rd edition of Africa Cup of Nations is officially underway in Cameroon. The hosts got off to a great start as they came from behind to beat Burkina Faso 2-1. Also in Group A, Cap Verde saw off a 10-man Ethiopia 1-0. FRANCE 24's Selina Sykes is joined by FRANCE 24's James Vasina and correspondent Claudia Nsono to discuss all the action.
11 Jan
After a long wait, the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations has finally kicked off in Cameroon after COVID-19 forced the Confederation of African Football (CAF) to postpone the tournament.
11 Jan
Prosecutors have added terrorism to the five charges a man who allegedly set fire to South Africa's parliament was already facing. The 49-year-old was also diagnosed with "paranoid schizophrenia."
15 Jan
It is estimated that more than 10 million people impacted by poverty, that has been worsened by the pandemic, are in need of aid. DW's Fred Muvunyi visited Adamawa in northern Nigeria, where an Islamist insurgency has also made farming unsafe.
14 Jan
Coronavirus shutdowns are ending across Africa. Officials don't view severe curbs as a suitable tool for containing the spread. Vaccinations alone won't cut it. Now, Africans are seeking a way to live with the virus.
14 Jan
African economies are beginning to recover from the impact of COVID-19. Despite making some gains in 2021, it could be difficult for nations to grow their economies in 2022.
17 Jan
A Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine booster shot is 84% effective in protecting against being hospitalised by the Omicron variant for 1-2 months after it is received, the head of South Africa's Medical Research Council (SAMRC), Glenda Gray, said on Friday.
19 Jan
We bring you the latest from the Africa Cup of Nations, where Senegal have finished top of their group, while four-time champions Ghana have crashed out of the tournament. But first, Mozambique's Defence and Security forces (FDS) say they have captured one of the leaders of the jihadist insurgency that's wreaked havoc in the region of Cabo Delgado. Also, shops were shuttered and streets barricaded in Khartoum after at least seven people were killed in protests on Monday in Sudan. And we see how Tanzania's first Netflix film "Binti" gives women a voice.
19 Jan
The omicron variant of COVID-19, which was first detected in South Africa, has so far resulted in fewer deaths and hospitalizations than previous waves. Though some experts warn not to take the variant lightly, life has almost returned to normal in cities such as Cape Town, where restaurants and bars are open for the first time since the pandemic began.
29 Jan
South African-American businessman Patrick Soon-Shiong was joined by President Cyril Ramaphosa on Wednesday to open a vaccine facility aimed at tackling a dearth of manufacturing capacity on the African continent
23 Jan
We look at the Brazilian papers' reactions to the death of national icon and samba diva Elza Soares at 91. Many papers are reacting to growing tensions in Ukraine as the threat of a Russian invasion looms. There's focus also on Vladimir Putin and his quest to reclaim Russia's lost glory. Finally, the famous M&Ms characters get a "woke" upgrade and not everyone's happy about it!
23 Jan
This week on The Observers, we spoke to Cynthia Kå who is using her social media pages to raise awareness of breast cancer among young people. She shares tips on how to prevent, as well as cope, with the disease. Next, we spoke to Murhula Zigabe, an entrepreneur in the Democratic Republic of Congo who is searching for eco-friendly solutions to common problems. He has been raising larvae from black soldier flies to be used as animal feed: an environmental and economical solution to food insecurity.