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WHO ‘truly sorry’ for sex abuse by Ebola workers in DR Congo

By AFP
02 October 2021   |   11:48 am
The World Health Organization again apologises to the victims who suffered rape and sexual abuse by workers sent to fight Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo from 2018 to 2020.

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