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The dilemma of saving Venice: Lagoon or city?

By France24
30 May 2022   |   10:22 am
Throughout history, Venetians have learned to live with high tides, known as acqua alta. But now, climate change is taking its toll on the ancient city, with flooding increasing in both frequency and intensity. Massive barriers, which temporarily separate the Venetian lagoon from the sea, have been designed to fend off the water. But they have also raised a difficult question: should Venice save itself or the lagoon’s fragile ecosystem?

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