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South Africa: Ramaphosa’s state of the nation speech delayed by protests

By France24
14 February 2020   |   2:30 pm
South Africa is in for more power cuts, says President Cyril Ramaphosa in his state of the nation address. The speech gets off to a tough start as he's heckled by the opposition before he delivers the gloomy news. Also, DR Congo's former spy boss is reportedly briefly held after returning from Ethiopia. Kalev Mutondo was the head of the Congolese National Intelligence Agency under former leader Joseph Kabila until he was fired by the new president last year. And finally, in a bid to be more environmentally friendly, more South African surfers are ditching the fibreglass for wooden surfboards.

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