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Rise in kidnappings shakes faith in Uganda’s police

By Reuters
16 April 2018   |   1:12 pm
Kidnappings have been rife in some African nations where security is weak such as oil-rich Nigeria. But their numbers have spiked recently in Uganda, emerging as a new source of insecurity in the East African nation where corruption is rife and public faith in police is wavering under President Yoweri Museveni's 32-year rule.

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