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Riding an African trend, Uganda welcomes young mothers back to school

By Reuters
28 February 2022   |   11:13 am
At a lakeside fishing village, 17-year-old Margaret Babirye cuddles her baby at lunchbreak before she returns to school. The young mother – and others like her who became pregnant during Uganda’s COVID-19 lockdown - are benefiting from a recent government decision to allow girls back into the classroom after they give birth. But the policy is meeting resistance from church leaders who argue that girls who are no longer "pure" could affect the morality of other children.

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