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In Abidjan, locals look back on Ivory Coast’s tense election day

By Abiodun Ogundairo
03 November 2020   |   7:00 am
In the aftermath of the tense presidential election, residents of Cocody, a commune of Abidjan, described polling stations as "broken" and witnessed "clashes". The outcome of the violence, which was numerous in the southern half of the country, is not immediately known, but both the opposition and the government have spoken of "deaths". The opposition had called on the population to boycott the election and to protest against the candidacy of Alassane Ouattara, who is seeking a third term.

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