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‘High’ risk of lethal Marburg spread in Africa: WHO

The risk of spread of the lethal Marburg disease, detected in Guinea, is 'high' according to Dr Matshidiso Moeti. West Africa's first recorded case of the virus -- which belongs to the same filovirus family as Ebola but is somewhat less deadly -- was confirmed on August 9. The virus, which is carried by bats and has a historic fatality rate of up to 88 percent, was found in samples taken from a patient who died on August 2 in Guinea's southern Gueckedou prefecture.

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