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Femicides on the rise in Cameroon: women’s rights activists blame culture of impunity

By France24
08 May 2022   |   2:22 pm
Domestic violence is on the rise, but under-reported in Cameroon. Campaigners say official figures account for only a fraction of the women who have suffered - or even died - at the hands of their partners. And for those seeking justice, advocates say successful prosecutions are rare due to the failings and corruption within Cameroon's judicial system.

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