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Reasons why people still use typewriter in Lagos

By Guardian Exclusive
08 March 2022   |   5:28 am
It is quite surprising and fascinating that in this digital era where personal computers and home printers are commonplace, the typewriter is still waxing strong. GuardianTV went to sample the opinion of professionals on why users and those who patronise the commercial typists still rely on the typewriter in this modern age of technology.

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