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Indian teenager Praggnanandhaa becomes world chess champion at 16

By Guardian Exclusive
26 February 2022   |   6:38 am
India’s teenage chess grandmaster Rameshbabu Praggnanandhaa has won praise for a stunning victory over world number one Magnus Carlsen in an online championship.

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