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How safe is this democracy?

By Guardian Exclusive
13 June 2020   |   7:37 pm
Today, in ‘Inside Stuff,’ multi-award-winning columnist and Executive Head of The Guardian's Editorial Board, Martins Oloja, is asking a question of how safe the democracy in Nigeria is after 21 years. He further states that the most important dividend of democracy which is freedom is lacking.

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