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Covid-19: Wedding bells silenced by a pandemic

By Guardian Exclusive
07 June 2020   |   8:35 am
The coronavirus pandemic has put life on pause for millions of people. Important life events and milestones have had to be canceled or postponed forever to help protect lives and properties. However, a few have been able to find a way around the seemingly dire situation.⁣

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