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Covid-19: Saudi Arabia enslaving African migrants

By Guardian Exclusive
04 September 2020   |   11:00 am
One of the world's wealthiest countries on earth, Saudi Arabia, is keeping hundreds of African migrants locked in conditions reminiscent of Libya’s slave camps because of COVID-19.

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