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Before Ekiti goes to the polls in 2022

By Guardian Exclusive
13 June 2022   |   5:38 am
No matter how an incumbent or ex-governor acts neutral and uninterested, his or her eyes are fixed on the process that will produce a successor. But before Ekiti goes to the polls to elect the next governor, here are a few questions the electorate needs to ask aspirants.

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