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All you need to know about a menstrual pain device

By Guardian Exclusive
12 May 2022   |   12:58 pm
A team of medical experts in Nairobi, Kenya, has designed an innovative design that helps reduce menstrual pain in women.

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Kabare prison is notorious for deaths in custody caused by hunger. Now, women are changing it with a food project.
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Afghanistan is heading back to the pre-2001 dark days of the Taliban, and Western powers were naive if they ever thought this wouldn't be the case. That's the view of Heather Barr, associate women's rights director at Human Rights Watch. As women are told to cover their faces in public again and female television presenters are told to do the same, she spoke to us on Perspective about the how the Taliban are rolling back women's rights and what, if anything, the West can do about it. "Life has become a prison for most women and girls," she told us.
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