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A federation without federal character || Inside Stuff

By Guardian Exclusive
07 March 2020   |   5:58 pm
The "federal character" is a principle, which was enshrined in Nigeria's Constitution since 1979 to ensure that appointments to public service institutions fairly reflect the linguistic, ethnic, religious, and geographic diversity of the country. As it is, it seems to be missing in our federation. The multi-award-winning columnist and Executive Head of The Guardian's Editorial Board, Martins Oloja, takes an analytical look at this issue in the latest installment of Inside Stuff. ⁣⁣⁣⁣

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