Sunday, 27th November 2022
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Why DRC’s art is worth fighting for

The Democratic Republic of Congo is home to a vibrant, and diverse, arts scene from contemporary creations to performance to dance. The DRC's more established artists are represented at festivals and exhibitions worldwide, but at home, they lack support or protection. We meet artists in Kinshasa to discuss the future of Congo's art scene.

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The Democratic Republic of Congo is home to a vibrant, and diverse, arts scene from contemporary creations to performance to dance. The DRC's more established artists are represented at festivals and exhibitions worldwide, but at home, they lack support or protection. We meet artists in Kinshasa to discuss the future of Congo's art scene.
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