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Watch an Algerian woman transform coffee capsules into pieces of art

By Reuters
26 July 2021   |   4:37 pm
An Algerian woman uses upcycled coffee capsules that she collects from cafes to create her jewellery. She also distributes coffee grounds to farmers for compost.

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