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Roaring good time: ‘Dinosaurs’ roam cycling track in Singapore

By Abiodun Ogundairo
28 October 2020   |   11:57 am
Cyclists and pedestrians stop to pose with a giant rampaging Tyrannosaurus Rex along a new cycling and jogging track in Singapore. Over 20 models from nine different prehistoric species are installed along the kilometre-long path, including bright blue velociraptors climbing on a buggy, a baby dinosaur hatching from an egg, and a long-necked apatosaurus peering at passersby over the fence. The Jurassic Mile is part of a new 3.5km connector that allows visitors to cycle into the city from the airport and vice versa. The attraction has already drawn controversy after it opened earlier this month. Changi Airport Group, which manages the path, installed additional netting after a stray ball from a nearby golf course hit a pedestrian and a dinosaur model was briefly removed for repairs after a video of a woman sitting on it went viral.

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28 Oct 2020
Cyclists and pedestrians stop to pose with a giant rampaging Tyrannosaurus Rex along a new cycling and jogging track in Singapore. Over 20 models from nine different prehistoric species are installed along the kilometre-long path, including bright blue velociraptors climbing on a buggy, a baby dinosaur hatching from an egg, and a long-necked apatosaurus peering at passersby over the fence. The Jurassic Mile is part of a new 3.5km connector that allows visitors to cycle into the city from the airport and vice versa. The attraction has already drawn controversy after it opened earlier this month. Changi Airport Group, which manages the path, installed additional netting after a stray ball from a nearby golf course hit a pedestrian and a dinosaur model was briefly removed for repairs after a video of a woman sitting on it went viral.
23 Nov 2020
Thousands of high school students upset about Thailand's lacklustre education system rally alongside protestors dressed as dancing dinosaurs in Bangkok.
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You thought dinosaurs became extinct after a meteor hit the Yucatan region of Mexico some 66 million years ago? Think again! A new study suggests the impact did indeed doom the animals, but that they were already on their way out due to a drop in temperatures. In this edition, we discuss this groundbreaking discovery with the co-author of the study, Fabien Condamine.