Wednesday, 5th October 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Pakistan’s dying art of storytelling

By France24
20 February 2022   |   12:44 pm
In Pakistan, where 70 percent of the population lives in rural areas, access to education remains a major issue. According to a recent study, 22 million Pakistani children never complete their 10 years of compulsory schooling. They either drop out or never begin school. The telling of tales and legends from older to younger generations has long served as an educational vehicle in rural areas. But storytellers are gradually disappearing in Pakistan, ousted by competition from televisions and smartphones. Our correspondents report.

Related

20 Nov 2021
Pakistan is witnessing an unprecedented economic turmoil, with the inflation rate rising exponentially. DW spoke to some locals who say it has become impossible for them to make ends meet.
17 Nov 2021
At least one person was killed and six people including children injured in an explosion in Pakistan's southern port city of Karachi on Wednesday, according to an official statement. Local media says the gas cylinder blast happened in a multi-story building in Lyari area the city. The police said the building was partially damaged.
19 Nov 2021
The Pakistani parliament has approved the law against sexual assault to allow courts to order chemical castrations — a punishment rights groups and lawyers called cruel.
26 Nov 2021
Religious parties argue the gender change law is promoting homosexuality, dubbing it "un-Islamic." A bill in the Muslim-majority country's Senate seeks to make the sex change procedure more difficult for citizens.
20 Dec 2021
Pakistan hosted a conference of Muslim countries pledging financial assistance to stave off "chaos" in Afghanistan. They vowed to unlock frozen aid funds and set up a humanitarian trust.
23 Dec 2021
The future is now: Today, a virtual Mona Lisa or a cat meme can be worth millions. Welcome to the world of NFTs. Fraudulent — or the future of the art world?
23 Dec 2021
Hong Kong's new M+ is aiming to be Asia's first global contemporary art museum. Its inaugural exhibition showcases 1,500 works, but following China's recent crackdown on dissent in Hong Kong, will the art on display there be free from censorship?
22 Jan
Pakistan is the world's fourth largest producer of milk. Domestic demand is strong and some 90 percent of the population consumes untreated raw milk. This provides an opportunity for corrupt retailers but also for farmers who are trying to survive inflation and falling profits. Some use illegal methods to increase the volume of the precious liquid – diluting milk with tap water is one of the most widespread techniques. Others even create fake milk from chemicals. Faced with this serious threat to public health, the authorities in Punjab province have stepped into action, as our correspondents report.
31 Jan
The Democratic Republic of Congo is home to a vibrant, and diverse, arts scene from contemporary creations to performance to dance. The DRC's more established artists are represented at festivals and exhibitions worldwide, but at home, they lack support or protection. We meet artists in Kinshasa to discuss the future of Congo's art scene.
2 Feb
At least 1,472 people — both non-Muslims and secular Muslims — have been charged under Pakistan's controversial blasphemy laws since 1987. Despite international pressure, Pakistani authorities are unwilling to amend or repeal the laws.
1 Feb
Speaking to DW, former Afghan MP Mariam Solaimankhil blamed Pakistan, particularly its spy agencies, for the Taliban's seizure of power in Afghanistan. She also stressed that "people around the former president Ghani" brought the country down.
6 Feb
Pakistani authorities imposed new restrictions on online content. Critics and content producers are worried about their negative impacts on the digital economy.