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London artist helps endangered animals with colourful murals

By AFP
09 November 2020   |   9:00 am
On the wall of a residential street in London’s neighbourhood of Charlton, Louis Masai puts the finishing touches to a striking large-scale mural of an orangutan. The British artist, known for his signature patchwork style, travels around the United Kingdom to paint colourful murals of animal species in decline or on the brink of extinction, to issue a warning about the devastating effects of climate change and biodiversity collapse.

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