Friday, 20th May 2022
<To guardian.ng
Search

Iraq: A revolution murdered

In the autumn of 2019, an unprecedented protest movement engulfed the Iraqi capital Baghdad and the predominantly Shiite south of the country. Demonstrators were angry at the widespread corruption and incompetence of the political class, but also the influence of neighbouring Iran and its militias. An extremely violent crackdown left at least 600 dead and 21,000 injured in just a few months. Meanwhile, the leaders of the protest movement became the target of assassinations. As Iraq prepares to hold parliamentary elections, more and more voices are accusing pro-Iranian armed groups of being behind a campaign of systematic violence. FRANCE 24's Jonathan Walsh and Amar Al Hameedawi report.

Related

18 Jul 2021
The blaze in the southern city of Nasiriya has been brought under control. The death toll is expected to rise and the fire may have been caused by an oxygen tank explosion.
17 Jul 2021
Aerial images show the aftermath of a fire which enveloped a Covid isolation unit and killed 64 in southern Iraq. The deadly blaze at Al-Hussein Hospital in the provincial capital Nasiriyah, which medics said was fuelled by the explosion of oxygen canisters, was the second such fire in Iraq in three months.
16 Jul 2021
For the first time in 20 years, child labour has increased around the world. Last year, 160 million youngsters were working, or 8.4 million more than in 2016. The Covid-19 crisis and resulting rise in poverty are often responsible. In Iraq, the number of children forced to work has increased steadily in recent decades due to conflict, forced displacement and economic challenges. Our correspondents Jack Hewson and Lucile Wassermann went to meet some of those who are trying to stem the scourge of child labour.
28 Jul 2021
The president outlined a "new phase" of US involvement in Iraq, which will still involve "dealing with ISIS." By the end of 2021, the US combat mission in the country will be over, almost two decades after it began.
7 Aug 2021
More than 10 people are reported to have died and at least 50 injured. State media blamed the attack on the 'Islamic State' (IS) militant group, which has revived its campaign of violence in Iraq.
5 Sep 2021
Sri Lanka's aim to become the world's first 100 percent organic food producer is threatening its famous tea industry. President Gotabaya Rajapaksa's ban on chemical fertiliser earlier this year has sparked concerns of a severe reduction in tea, the island's main export commodity, as well other crops by the end of this year.
4 Sep 2021
Paris is famous around the world for its beautiful sights and towering monuments, but it's also somewhat infamous for its driving culture. Parisian drivers are the first to admit that manoeuvring the streets can be quite a harrowing experience. Over the years, Paris's authorities have taken steps to limit traffic in the French capital and encourage alternative modes of transport like cycling. The idea is to make the capital safer while also cutting air pollution, yet this has sparked growing rage among drivers. We take a closer look in this edition of French Connections.
10 Oct 2021
In the autumn of 2019, an unprecedented protest movement engulfed the Iraqi capital Baghdad and the predominantly Shiite south of the country. Demonstrators were angry at the widespread corruption and incompetence of the political class, but also the influence of neighbouring Iran and its militias. An extremely violent crackdown left at least 600 dead and 21,000 injured in just a few months. Meanwhile, the leaders of the protest movement became the target of assassinations. As Iraq prepares to hold parliamentary elections, more and more voices are accusing pro-Iranian armed groups of being behind a campaign of systematic violence. FRANCE 24's Jonathan Walsh and Amar Al Hameedawi report.
14 Oct 2021
Years of protests have resulted in some reforms. But, in the run-up to Iraq's parliamentary elections, optimism for genuine systemic political change remains slim, and voter turnout could hit an all-time low.
11 Oct 2021
The elections, which took place amid a widespread election boycott by anti-government activists, didn't generate much enthusiasm among Iraq's young population.
19 Oct 2021
Scotland’s Northern Isles, Orkney and Shetland, have long benefited from North Sea oil revenues. But with reserves declining, and climate change forcing a transformation of energy policy around the world, the islands have become a hotbed of renewable energy innovation. As Scotland prepares to host the COP26 UN climate summit in November, the Northern Isles could serve as an example for other nations, both of cutting edge technologies, and of difficult political choices.
26 Oct 2021
It has been two and half years since Sudanese protesters peacefully overthrew their dictator Omar al-Bashir in a jubilant moment for Sudan. But the path to democracy has not run smoothly. Infighting has plagued the country's joint military-civilian coalition and steep price rises have shaken people's faith in their leaders. For weeks, rumours had swirled of a coup d'état. This Monday morning, it happened: Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok was arrested and military chief Abdel Fattah al-Burhan appeared on television, declaring a state of emergency and dissolving the country's ruling body. Is this the death knell for Sudan's revolution? Or will the military's actions breathe new life into the protest movement?