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City at a crossroads: Transport revolution underway on streets of Paris

By France24
04 September 2021   |   8:05 am
Paris is famous around the world for its beautiful sights and towering monuments, but it's also somewhat infamous for its driving culture. Parisian drivers are the first to admit that manoeuvring the streets can be quite a harrowing experience. Over the years, Paris's authorities have taken steps to limit traffic in the French capital and encourage alternative modes of transport like cycling. The idea is to make the capital safer while also cutting air pollution, yet this has sparked growing rage among drivers. We take a closer look in this edition of French Connections.

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