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A tragic club, an art imbroglio and sandy feet

By France24
14 April 2021   |   2:07 pm
We take a look at the Covid-19 hurdles France is facing, as it nears the tragic milestone of 100,000 deaths from the coronavirus. We also dive into the twists and turns around one of the world's most expensive paintings, the "Salvator Mundi". Finally, we discuss 100,000-year-old footprints and an age-old love for wiggling your toes in the sand.

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