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1921 Tulsa massacre: Remembering a dark chapter in American history

By France24
28 May 2021   |   1:13 pm
The United States is preparing to remember the Tulsa race massacre. It was 100 years ago when a White mob set fire to the town and bombed a prosperous Black neighbourhood from the air in Tulsa, Oklahoma, killing an estimated 300 Black men, women and children. There are a few survivors left but they appeared before the US Congress this week. We take a closer look.

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